Last edited by Dugore
Saturday, August 8, 2020 | History

1 edition of Public libraries as partners in youth development. found in the catalog.

Public libraries as partners in youth development.

Public libraries as partners in youth development.

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Published by DeWitt Wallace-Reader"s Digest Fund in New York, N.Y .
Written in English


Edition Notes

ContributionsDeWitt Wallace-Reader"s Digest Fund.
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL19223808M

  Step inside the world’s most modern libraries and you’ll find dynamic tools and spaces, from podcast recording studios to game development labs. Robotic book . In the post-Stonewall era, the role of libraries in providing information and services to LGBTQ individuals has been a topic of discussion among library ies can often play an important role for LGBTQ individuals looking to find information about coming out, health, and family topics, as well as leisure reading. In the past 40 years, advocate organizations for LGBTQ content.

Yes -- you can return these special library materials at participating libraries during the same hours that the Books on the Go service is available, from 10 a.m. – 6 p.m., Monday – Saturday from 10 a.m. – 6 p.m., (Monday – Friday at Express Library - Fayetteville Street).   IFLA paper on safe spaces for LGBTQ youth in public libraries Oasis Magazine: An online writing community for teens with journals and poetry. Live Out Loud: Organizes panel discussions for GLBT youth with "men and women in the gay community who are passionate and powerful in their life’s work, who are making a difference in the community.

Your library is here for summer learning, with great books, online events, and more ways to connect and have fun. Grab and Go service As part of its phased reopening plan, Hennepin County Library is offering new grab and go services for patrons, accommodating short in-person visits. Public Schools and public libraries can apply for $ grants for projects that foster creativity in diverse communities Lois Lenski Covey Foundation This foundation awards grants for the purchase of children's books to public libraries, school libraries, and non-profit agencies serving disadvantaged populations.


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Public libraries as partners in youth development Download PDF EPUB FB2

4 Public Libraries as Partners in Youth Development S ervice to youth has been a mainstay of the history of pub-lic libraries in the United States. Many of the earliest public libraries founded in this coun-try in the first half of the s were established to benefit youth.

By the turn of the century, the special-ization of children’s. The Wallace Foundation / Knowledge Center / Public Libraries as Partners in Youth Development Libraries|daca-6ec97ad;Past Initiatives|2da32bfb-dd4fa8-bece Page Content.

Get this from a library. Public libraries as partners in youth development. [DeWitt Wallace-Reader's Digest Fund.;]. "Public Libraries as Partners in Youth Development: Lessons and Voices from the Field," published by the Forum in partnership with the Urban Libraries Council, captures key challenges and lessons learned from an innovative, four-year initiative sponsored by the Wallace-Reader's Digest Funds that awarded six million dollars to nine library by:   PUBLIC LIBRARIES AS PARTNERS IN YOUTH DEVELOPMENT I In designing this new initiative, the Fund recognized that nthe DeWitt Wallace-Reader’s Digest Fund public libraries have always been part of the support announced plans for a new initiative, Public system in communities for young people.

An American Library Association study produced a document entitled Public Libraries as Partners in Youth Development, which outlines the need for library professionals in the youth services area. In response to this need, the University of North Texas College of Information Department of Information Science is pleased to offer the first.

CiteSeerX - Document Details (Isaac Councill, Lee Giles, Pradeep Teregowda): This paper reports on a significant new approach to young adult services in American public libraries.

Rather than focusing on books or information, young adult librarians are instead beginning to focus on the adolescents themselves. The intent is to bring the library’s resources to bear on the healthy development. Libraries belong to the community and are central to it. They are open to all, and provide essential services to help people and neighborhoods thrive.

From internet access and homework help, to storytimes and English as a Second Language programs, libraries offer vital resources to address community needs, and they are a place where the community gathers.

According to key findings from the “Public Libraries as Partners in Youth Development (PLPYD), a Wallace Foundation Initiative,” public libraries selected for this program were challenged to “develop or expand youth programs that engaged individual teens in a developmentally supportive manner while enhancing library services for all youth.

Before the Wallace-Reader’s Digest Fund launched the Public Librar- ies as Partners in Youth Development (PLPYD) demonstration project, it commissioned a marketing study to determine what teens think about the public library.

What the data gatherers learned from talking to teens in ten communities around the country is instructive. In addition, they are bringing new and often underserved families to the library and introducing them to library resources, facilitating new community partnerships, engaging local leaders with the library, increasing the visibility of library services, and providing new opportunities for youth development.

This book was written by the instructor and students of a graduate-level course for preservice school and public youth services librarians titled Instruction for Youth in School and Public Libraries.

The instructor, Dr. Casey H. Rawson, edited the text and wrote or co-wrote several chapters. Workforce Development and Libraries.

The Office of Commonwealth Libraries' Library Services and Technology Act five-year plan identifies workforce development services as a priority. The Governor’s Advisory Council on Library Development endorsed this work in July by resolving to: Encourage public libraries' efforts to work with workforce investment boards in order to advance.

Several trends have come together to intensify interest in how public libraries might best support the interests and needs of youth in their communities.

This study reports on findings from the Public Libraries as Partners in Youth Development (PLPYD) Initiative, a four-year, nine-site initiative funded by the Wallace Foundation to develop innovative models for public libraries to provide high. Before the Wallace-Reader's Digest Fund launched the Public Libraries as Partners in Youth Development (PLPYD) demonstration project, it commissioned a marketing study to determine what teens think about the public library.

Public libraries have a special responsibility to support the process of learning to read, and to promote books and other media for children. The library must provide special events for children, such as storytelling and activities related to the library’s services and resources.

Responding to a Concerned Adult If your library serves youth, you may find that you need to respond to a concerned adult — such as a parent, guardian or board member — about resources and services in your library. This document is designed to help you explain how and why your library selects the resources it provides.

It can also help you respond to questions and challenges about material. While the vast majority of the US public tends to equate “books” with “libraries,” leading teen services librarians think in terms of leveraging library resources and services to support teens’ healthy development as their primary service goal, as opposed to focusing on building great book collections.

3 This means that cutting-edge. Library Support and Development Services website. We provide leadership, grants, and other assistance to improve library service for all Oregonians.

DeWitt Wallace Reader’s Digest Fund supports Public Libraries as Partners in Youth Development (Bernier). • YALSA establishes Michael L. Printz Award for Excellence in Young Adult Literature (YALSA Web site).

• Jana Fine is YALSA president, “Sound Bytes, Billboards, Neon Lights: Marketing to Teens” (Murphy). Partnerships have great potential to expand your library’s capacity to offer more, reach broader audiences, and leverage your resources.

As libraries continually seek new ways to stretch their budgets, partnering is a valuable option to consider. There are several natural partnerships that many libraries have formed: 1) Literacy Partnerships.

Partner with your local literacy organization [ ].In a time when schools are cutting libraries, it’s wonderful to see new and excellent libraries like the new student Waunakee Intermediate School library designed by Eppstein Uhen Architects.

Books are located throughout the open space plus the room has two .development by providing access to information. A Statement from the Libraries for Children and Young Adults Section (CHILD), International Federa-tion of Library Associations (IFLA) Libraries for Children and Young Adults are essential for information and development.

It is in child-hood and youth that all kinds of literacy skills are best built.